Getting Started with a Raspberry Pi

So, I have had a Raspberry Pi for about a month now and sadly I have not had as much time as I would like to devote to the little guy! I was able to get it fired up and man was that easy!

I’ll go through a bit of what I got/did for setting it up.

I knew that there is more than just having a Raspberry Pi, you need other tools to use it! So, I ordered this kit that looked like it had good reviews on amazon and it has Prime (I’m a Prime addict).
So, I ordered this kit: http://tinyurl.com/nsrratm

it includes: Raspberry Pi B+, case, power plug, heat sinks, 8 gig Micro USB Card (with Linux Pre-Installed) , a HDMI cable and  a USB wifi card.

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This is a pretty great deal for all the extras, you get. If you really think that you want to dig into the Raspberry Pi. I would suggest putting down a bit more money and buying a kit that includes the camera, breadboard and other electrical components as well.

Firing it UP!

No, dont be like me and buy this and just assume that everything will work fine. I quickly found out that I dont have a USB keyboard, so I needed that, then I realized that my computer monitor does not support HDMI, so I had to connect it to a TV for setup. Not the end of the world, but if you are planning on using it at your Desk , make sure that you have a HDMI capable monitor or an adapter. So, I needed an adapter too. I purchased this VGA > HDMI adapter to plug my Pi into the monitor at my desk http://tinyurl.com/mybl8z5.

 

Another issue that I ran into was with the Display: Some people have trouble getting VGA Adapters to work. I know that there is a power issue that can affect some people. I was worried for a minute as I went from using an adapter for a DVI monitor and then went from an adapter for a VGA and the monitor was not recognized. As I agonized over my Pi not showing anything I did some digging and found that there is a bit of linux work you have to do to make sure that you can transition from each type of monitor.

So, in your Pi you need to un-comment the following lines so that they look like this:

# Uncomment if you get no picture on HDMI for a default "safe" mode
hdmi_safe=1

# Uncomment if an HDMI display is not detected and composite is being output.
hdmi_force_hotplug=1

That should resolve any issues with Raspberry Pi Monitors. Hopefully (it did for me). The other option is to use your Pi without a monitor which honestly is the easiest idea. You will want to do that through SSH. I will explain that in a future post! So, buy a Pi and get to Tinkering.